Courses

Spring 2018

AS 323 Gender in South Asian Literature

Instructor: Dr. Carolyn Marcille

Reg #23579, TuTh 9:30AM – 10:50AM, Capen 260
3 credits

Draupadi in Mahabharata

Curious about women and women’s issues in India? AS 323 will be an exciting introduction to gender in South Asian literature. We’ll be looking at texts stretching from the Mahabarata to modern Mumbai, and discussing how women’s issues have changed and evolved over India’s timeline. To achieve this, we will focus on a multimodal curriculum that allows women from numerous backgrounds to be heard in multiple ways, including poetry, autobiography and film. We will discuss pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial women’s voices, as well as how the Raj impacted female expression. But we’ll also look at the ways in which India’s women are working to achieve an egalitarian existence in a consistently patriarchal culture.

 

AS 393 Bollywood and Indian Cinema

Instructor: Dr. Carolyn Marcille

Reg #23581, TuTh 12:30PM – 1:50PM, O’Brian 209
3 credits

Bollywood poster

“College di gate de is taraf hum life ko nachate hai … te duji taraf life humko nachati hai” – Rang de Basanti
In the film Rang De Basanti, Aamir Khan utters these lines, which can roughly be translated to “inside the gates of college, we make our lives dance to our tunes. Outside, life makes us dance to it’s own.” So while you’re here, why not learn about a film genre that not only has important lessons to give about life, but also has impressive song and dance breaks? This course is a chronological exploration of Hindi cinema, stretching from the 1940s to the present. From its flashy item numbers, to chocolate heroes starring in masala films, to arguing over the best playback singer, Bollywood films offer delights that no other genre can. But beneath its flashy exterior, Bollywood can also offer moral lessons for societal improvement, provide examples of changing class and familial dynamics, track the influence of the West on a traditionally South Asian art form, and have its finger perennially on India’s cultural pulse. In short, Bollywood can be all things to all people. What will it be for you?

HIN 102 Intensive 1st-Year Hindi-Urdu

Instructor: Dr. Vandana Iyer

MWF 9:00 – 10:25 am; Bell 325

Hindi-Urdu-English vocabulary in verse

A five-credit course that will introduce the closely-related languages of Hindi and Urdu, intended for students with no or very limited exposure to these or related South Asian languages. At the introductory level, Hindi and Urdu are similar in vocabulary and grammar but use different scripts. Students will gain competency in speaking Hindi and Urdu, and in reading and writing these languages using both scripts. This is the second semester of a year-long sequence that prepares students for 2nd-year HIN 193-194. No prerequisites.

Fulfills a component of the UB Global Pathway in Introductory Hindi-Urdu.

Spring 2017

AS 383 / ENG 383 India in the Traveler’s Eye (Honors Seminar)

Instructor: Walter N. Hakala

Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:30 – 1:50 pm, Capen 108

Air India poster

The idea of “India” has long attracted the attention of people from afar. Whether in search of gold or enlightenment, the “India” carried in the traveler’s imagination often conflicts with the India that is actually encountered. This course is intended to serve not just as an introduction to the motivations and experiences of travelers to India, but also to the forms of knowledge that are produced in the wake of such travels. We will begin by examining the accounts of early Greek ambassadors and sailors and Chinese pilgrims seeking wealth and knowledge. Both Muslim and Christian adventurers produced travelogues that describe the marvels of India in the medieval period. The Mughal court fascinated Europeans sojourners, while Indian travelers were in turn both delighted and disgusted by what they observed in Europe. Hippies more recently and in their own way reenact quests by colonial British officials for the sublime and picturesque. The diversity of perspectives that these works present challenges readers to consider what it means to be an “outsider” looking “in” on a culture, compelling us to consider arguments for and against treating certain geographic and political regions and temporal periods as coherent cultural zones.
By reading and discussing a wide range of both primary and secondary source materials, students will develop a broad familiarity with the history, literatures, religions, and geography of South Asia. All of the readings are in English and no background in South Asian languages, history, or literature is expected. In addition to completing brief UBlearns response papers on directed topics and making weekly contributions to collaborative “Running Notes” on assigned readings, seminar participants will spend the second half of the semester preparing a final project consisting of a prospectus, annotated bibliography, and research paper. All of the texts are in English and no background in South Asian languages, literature, or history is expected.

Satisfies a Breadth of Literary Study requirement for English majors and an upper-level elective requirement for Asian Studies majors and minors.

HIN 102 Intensive 1st-Year Hindi-Urdu

Instructor: Alizishaan Khatri

MWF 9:00 – 10:25 am; Bell 325

Hindi-Urdu-English vocabulary in verse

A five-credit course that will introduce the closely-related languages of Hindi and Urdu, intended for students with no or very limited exposure to these or related South Asian languages. At the introductory level, Hindi and Urdu are similar in vocabulary and grammar but use different scripts. Students will gain competency in speaking Hindi and Urdu, and in reading and writing these languages using both scripts. This is the second semester of a year-long sequence that prepares students for 2nd-year HIN 193-194. No prerequisites.

Fulfills a component of the UB Global Pathway in Introductory Hindi-Urdu.

Questions about HIN 102? Email Professor Mitsuaki Shimojo, Director of Language Programs 

Fall 2016

AS 221 / ENG 221 Romance Traditions in Asia

Instructor: Walter N. Hakala

MWF 12:00-12:50 pm; Norton 210

Painting of two Indian lovers

This course will introduce students to narratives of romance that span Asia’s wide variety of religious, literary, theatrical, and cinematic traditions. Rather than defining romance by what it contains, we will instead consider what romance as a genre does. Through this approach, it becomes possible to examine why certain narratives were compelling enough to be transmitted across and preserved within a diverse range of cultures and historical periods. “Texts” include English translations of Sanskrit drama, a Hindi Sufi mystical work, an early Japanese novel, recent Bollywood cinema, Korean television melodramas, and the worldwide Harlequin Romance phenomenon. All readings are in English. There are no prerequisites for this class.

Satisfies SUNY Humanities and Other World Civilizations requirements, as well as 200-level requirements for English and Asian Studies majors and minors. 

Classics 113 (RSP 113/APY 168) Myth and Religion in the Ancient World

Instructor:  Roger D. Woodard

MWF 1:00–1:50 pm; Knox 104

Jain murti overlooking Muslim tomb in Mehrauli, Delhi

Myth and Religion in the Ancient World provides a comparative analysis of the mythic and religious traditions of various early Indo-European peoples, in coverage extending chronologically and geographically from Vedic India to Medieval Ireland and Scandinavia, focusing on ancient Greece and, especially Rome.  The analytic model used is that of, chiefly, Émile Benveniste and Georges Dumézil.

HIN 101 Intensive 1st-Year Hindi-Urdu

Instructor: Alizishaan Khatri

MWF 9:00 – 10:25 am; Baldy 126

Hindi-Urdu-English vocabulary in verse

A five-credit course that will introduce the closely-related languages of Hindi and Urdu, intended for students with no or very limited exposure to these or related South Asian languages. At the introductory level, Hindi and Urdu are similar in vocabulary and grammar but use different scripts. Students will gain competency in speaking Hindi and Urdu, and in reading and writing these languages using both scripts. This is the first semester of a year-long sequence that prepares students for 2nd-year HIN 193-194. No prerequisites.

Questions about HIN 101? Email Professor Mitsuaki Shimojo, Director of Language Programs